Crisis at Guantanamo: Will the Prison Ever Close?


 

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

CRISIS AT GUANTANAMO: WILL THE PRISON EVER CLOSE?

Featuring Carol Rosenberg, David H. Remes, Dr. Gerald E. Thomson, and others. 

 

On May 10, 2013, the Center hosted a discussion with leading experts on Guantanamo about the current conditions there and the feasibility of closing down the prison.

Guantanamo Bay is a prison in crisis. At least 100 inmates, many of whom have been cleared for release, are participating in a hunger strike to protest years of detention without charges. Prison officials have resorted to force-feeding prisoners, a practice that many medical and human rights experts claim is inhumane and illegal. Some prisoners may be close to death. At a press conference on Tuesday, May 7, 2013, President Obama criticized the prison and vowed to renew efforts to close it.

Watch the full video of the discussion below:

Panelists:

Carol Rosenberg is the military-affairs reporter at The Miami Herald. In 2011, she received the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for her nearly decade of reporting on the Guantanamo Bay prison. 

David H. Remes is an American lawyer who has served as a pro bono attorney for several of the prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay prison. He was involved in litigation surrounding the Detainees Treatment Act of 2005, which denied prisoners the ability to submit habeas corpus petitions. 

Dr. Gerald E. Thomson is the Lambert and Sonneborn Professor of Medicine Emeritus at Columbia University, and the former president of the American College of Physicians. He also served on The Constitution Project's Task Force on Detainee Treatment, an independent bipartisan panel, which has recently released an exhaustive report on the capture, detention, and interrogation of terror suspects during the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administration

Karen J. Greenberg (moderator) is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. She is the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days (2009), which was selected as one of the best books of 2009 by The Washington Post and Slate.com. 

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