Government, Secrecy, and National Security: The Government's Need for Secrecy vs. the Public's Right to Know


THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

GOVERNMENT, SECRECY, AND NATIONAL SECURITY: THE GOVERNMENT'S NEED FOR SECRECY VS. THE PUBLIC'S RIGHT TO KNOW

Panelists included former Homeland Security Advisor to President George W. Bush Ken Wainstain, New York Times Reporter Scott Shane, federal prosecutor Neil MacBride and others.

 

On October 16, 2012, the Center hosted an exciting, all-day conference on the balance between government secrecy, transparency and public access to information. Panelists analyzed the implications of various national security leaks, including military drone strikes, enhanced interrogation programs and WikiLeaks.

Panelists:

Kenneth Wainstein is the former National Security Advisor in the last Bush Administration.

James Robertson is the former U.S. District Judge who also served on the FISA court. He has presided over high-profile cases in the "war on terror," including Hamdan v. Rumsfeld.

Marty Lederman is the former Deputy Assistant AG in the Office of Legal Counsel. He has authored seminal government documents on national security issues. 

Scott Shane is a New York Times reporter. He has written on important national security issues, including the use of waterboarding by the CIA and President Obama's personal involvement in his administration's undisclosed drone program.

Neil MacBride is the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia. 

John Rizzo is the former acting General Counsel at the CIA for the first nine years of the "war on terror." He had personally signed off on all CIA-directed drone attacks from September 2001 until October 2009. 

Steven Aftergood is editor of Secrecy News. He has published thousands of leaked documents on his blog, and yet turned down an invitation to join the board of directors at Wikileaks. He instead sharply criticized the organization for ignoring the rule of law and the individual's right to privacy.

Ben Wizner is the Director of the ACLU's Speech, Privacy, & Technology Project.

Glenn Fine is the former Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Karen Greenberg is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School and author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days, which was selected as one of the best books of 2009.

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