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An Uncertain Ally: Turkey Under Erdogan's Dictatorship

A Conversation with Author, David Phillips

On February 27, 2017 the Center on National Security hosted a conversation with David Phillips, Director of Columbia's University Program on Peace-building and Rights on his newest book,  An Uncertain Ally: Turkey Under Erdogan's DictatorshipAn Uncertain Ally is a straightforward indictment of Erdogan. Drawing on inside sources in his Justice and Development Party (AKP) and the police, the book reveals corruption and money laundering schemes that benefited Erdogan, his cronies, and family members. 

David L. Phillips is Director of the Program on Peace-building and Rights at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights. Phillips has served as Foreign Affairs Expert and as Senior Adviser to the U.S. Department of State and as Senior Adviser to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Phillips has worked at academic institutions as Executive Director of Columbia University’s International Conflict Resolution Program, Director of American University’s Program on Conflict Prevention and Peace-building, Fellow at Harvard University’s Future of Diplomacy Project Fellow, Visiting Scholar at Harvard University’s Center for Middle East Studies, and Professor of Preventive Diplomacy at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna. He was Deputy Director of the Center for Preventive Action at the Council on Foreign Relations, Senior Fellow at the Preventive Diplomacy Program of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council, and Project Director at the International Peace Research Institute of Oslo. Phillips has also been a foundation executive, serving as President of the Congressional Human Rights Foundation and Executive Director of the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity. Phillips was an analyst and commentator for NBC News, CNBC, and the British Broadcasting Company.

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REVISITING GUANTANAMO BAY

Where We've Come, Where We're Headed

On February 14, The Center on National Security hosted a panel discussion on the future of Guantanamo Bay under the next administration.

Carol Rosenberg has been a staff correspondent with the Miami Herald since Sept. 1, 1990, and has served as Middle East correspondent, Washington correspondent, Foreign Affairs writer and Military Affairs correspondent. She has covered the Guantanamo Bay detention center and related controversies since before the first prisoners arrived there on January 11, 2002, and is the lone journalist to document the operations from the earliest days until the present. 

Ambassador Lee Wolosky is Special Envoy for Guantanamo Closure at the United States Department of State. He has extensive experience in and out of government dealing with the most complicated problems at the juncture of national security, foreign policy and the law. His previous government positions include Director for Transnational Threats on the National Security Council under Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush. 

Michel Paradis is currently a senior attorney with the Military Commissions Defense Organization at the United States Department of Defense. In that role, he is regularly appointed to represent detainees held at the U.S. Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He has argued numerous cases before the nation’s highest courts including, al Bahlul v. United States and Al Nashiri v. Obama

Hina Shamsi is the Director of the ACLU’s National Security Project. She has litigated cases upholding the freedoms of speech and association, and challenging targeted killing, torture, unlawful detention, and discrimination against racial and religious minorities. She previously worked as a Staff Attorney in the National Security Project and was the Acting Director of Human Rights First's Law & Security Program.

Karen J. Greenberg is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law. She is the author most recently of Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State. She is also the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days (2009), which was selected as one of the best books of 2009 by The Washington Post. Greenberg is the Editor-in-Chief of the Stroz Friedberg Cyber Brief and The Soufan Group Morning Brief.

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IS THE UNITED STATES PREPARED?

Zero Days, Cyber Wars, and the Russian Hack

On Thursday, January 5, 2017, The Center on National Security hosted a special panel discussion with top experts on cyberwarfare, the U.S.-Russia relationship, and how to understand the hack. The panel was followed by the screening of Alex Gibney's acclaimed film, Zero Days, a documentary thriller about the world of cyberwar. As the US reels over the Russian cyber attacks that disrupted our presidential election, Zero Days is a tale that illuminates how we got to where we are: a world of worldwide cyber attacks guided by no treaties or laws, that threatens to destabilize modern life as we know it. 

Alex Gibney is an American documentary film director and producer. Gibney has been called “the most important documentarian of our time” by Esquire Magazine and “one of America’s most successful and prolific documentary filmmakers” by The New York Times. His previous work includes Taxi to the Dark Side, winner of the 2007 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, the Emmy-award winning Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015), and Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005), among others.

David Sanger is the chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, covering foreign policy, globalization, nuclear proliferation, and the presidency for 30 years. Sanger has been a member of two teams that won the Pulitzer Prize and is the author of Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, and The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power.

Rob Knake is the Whitney Shepardson senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. His work focuses on Internet governance, public-private partnerships, and cyber conflict. Knake served from 2011 to 2015 as director for cybersecurity policy at the National Security Council. In this role, he was responsible for the development of presidential policy on cybersecurity, and built and managed federal processes for cyber incident response and vulnerability management.

Marcus Baram is the Senior News Editor of FastCompany.com. Baram has worked as an editor at the New York Observer, The Wall Street Journal, and the Huffington Post. He has written and reported for the New York Daily News, ABC News, The New York Times, and the New Yorker.

Karen J. Greenberg is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law. She is the author most recently of Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State. Greenberg is also the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days (2009), which was selected as one of the best books of 2009 by The Washington Post and Slate.com. 

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The Center on National Security

presents

A Conversation with Senator Chris Murphy

The Center on National Security hosted a U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) for a discussion on "U.S. Foreign Policy Today" on October 6, 2016. 

Senator Chris Murphy is the Junior United States Senator from Connecticut. He has dedicated his career to public service, working on numerous issues including job creation, affordable health care, education, and foreign policy. He is a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, serving as the Chairman of the Subcommittee on European Affairs (2013 - 2014) and as Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Near East, Central and South Asia, and Counterterrorism (2015 - present). He previously served in the United States House of Representatives, representing Connecticut's 5th congressional district from 2007 to 2013. Before being elected to Congress, Senator Murphy was a member of both chambers of the Connecticut General Assembly, serving in the Connecticut House of Representatives (1999-2003) and the Connecticut Senate (2003-2007).

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Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State

A discussion with author, Karen Greenberg, moderated by David McCraw

On June 1, 2016, Karen Greenberg discussed her newest book, Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State, the definitive account of how America’s War on Terror sparked a decade-long assault on the rule of law, weakening our courts and our Constitution in the name of national security.

Karen J. Greenberg is Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law. She is the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days and co-editor of The Torture Papers: The Road to Abu Ghraib.

David McCraw, moderator, is a Vice President and Assistant General Counsel at The New York Times Company. Mr. McCraw has served as lead litigation counsel in more than 25 freedom-of-information suits brought by the Times in state and federal courts. He is an adjunct professor at NYU School of Law. 

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Hindsight: Reflections on 15 Years of the War on Terror

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Hindsight: Reflections on 15 Years of the War on Terror

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

HINDSIGHT: REFLECTIONS ON 15 YEARS OF THE WAR ON TERROR

 

On Tuesday, April 26th, the Center on National Security hosted over twenty experts in the fields of national security, foreign policy, and counterterrorism to discuss the evolution of national security policy since 9/11. With over 400 people in attendance, this timely discussion looked at government oversight, Middle East policy, and the national security landscape for the next president.  

 

Watch full videos of the discussion below:

The conference featured an opening conversation between former U.S. counterterrorism czar, Richard Clarke, and Center on National Security Director, Karen Greenberg, that addressed the contents of a classified 28-page portion of a joint congressional report on 9/11, the fallout from what Clarke described as President Obama's "overcautious" approach to Syria, and America's struggles to combat cybersecurity threats. 

This first panel of the day, "Reconciling Liberty and Security in 2016," addressed the following questions: "What is the state of U.S. counterterrorism policy since 9/11?" "Has a more balanced management of threats and responses evolved over time?" and "Where is future policy headed in response to the emergence of ISIS?" 

Panelists:

Rachel Brand, Board Member, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

David Cole, Professor in Law and Public Policy, Georgetown Law School  

Jameel Jaffer, Deputy Legal Director, ACLU

Matthew Olsen, President, IronNet CyberSecurity

Matthew Waxman, Professor, Columbia Law School 

Michel Paradis, Senior Attorney, Military Commissions Defense Organization, U.S. Department of Defense  

The conversation between John Miller, the NYPD's Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism, and Ali Soufan, a former FBI agent and Chairman/CEO of The Soufan Groupm provided firsthand accounts of how terrorism spread from the mountains of Afghanistan and is combated today in New York. 

The second panel of the day, "Today's Foreign Policy Matrix," addressed the following questions: "What foreign policy challenges in the Middle East will the incoming president immediately face?" and "How have institutions dedicated to foreign policy altered to address the non-state actor and at what cost?"

Panelists:

Gen. Charles Jacoby, U.S. Army General (Retired), Thayer Leader Development Group, West Point

Douglas Ollivant, ASU Future of War Senior Fellow, New America

Gideon Rose, Editor, Foreign Affairs

Emma Sky, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Yale University 

Steven Simon, Visiting Lecturer, Dartmouth College 

The last panel of the day, "The Evolution of Terrorism from al Qaeda to ISIS," addressed the following questions: "In what ways does the threat of ISIS in the U.S. differ from the threat posed by al Qaeda?" "How should U.S. domestic policy best address ISIS?" and "Has the rise of the Islamic State changed the way we look at jihadist terrorism?" 

Panelists:

J.M. Berger, Fellow, Program on Extremism, George Washington University 

Joshua Dratel, Attorney, Law Offices of Joshua L. Dratel 

Hina Shamsi, Director, National Security Project, ACLU

Adam Shatz, Contributing Editor, London Review of Books

Phil Hirschkorn, Senior Producer, PBS NewsHour Weekend

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Iran in Context

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Iran in Context

 

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

IRAN IN CONTEXT

Panelists included Laura Secor and Hooman Majd

 

On February 23, 2016, the Center hosted the hour-long "Iran in Context," during which two journalists who reported extensively on Iran over the past decade discussed the country's parliamentary elections, the role of women in Iranian society, and the country's nuclear deal with the United States. 

Laura Secor, author of Children of Paradise: The Struggle for the Soul of Iran, and Hooman Majd, an Iranian-American journalist and author of three books on Iran, also shared insights on the country's relationship with Russia, its involvement in the fight against ISIS, and its leaders' views on the 2016 American presidential candidates. 

The event took place just three days before Iranian voters cast ballots to elect members of Tehran's 290-seat parliament and 88-member Assembly of Experts. 

 

Watch a video of the entire discussion below:

Panelists:

Laura Secor is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Foreign Affairs, The New Republic, and other publications. She has served as a staff editor for the New York Times Op-Ed page, a reporter for the Boston Globe’s Ideas section, and as acting executive editor of the American Prospect. She was an editor and writer for Lingua Franca magazine from 1997-2001. She was a 2008-2009 fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library and a fellow at the American Academy in Berlin both in the fall 2009 and spring 2013. Her most recent book, Children of Paradise: The Struggle for the Soul of Iran chronicles Iran's reform movement. 

Hooman Majd was born in Tehran, Iran in 1957, and lived abroad from infancy with his family who were in the diplomatic service. He’s authored New York Times bestselling book The Ayatollah Begs to Differ (2008), The Ayatollahs’ Democracy (2010) & The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay (2013). Majd has also written for GQ, Newsweek, The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New Republic, The Financial Times, Foreign Policy and Foreign Affairs, among others.

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United States of Jihad: Investigating America's Homegrown Terrorists

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United States of Jihad: Investigating America's Homegrown Terrorists

 

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

UNITED STATES OF JIHAD: INVESTIGATING AMERICA'S HOMEGROWN TERRORISTS

Featuring Peter Bergen

 

Since 9/11, more than three hundred Americans have been indicted or convicted of terrorism charges. Among the perpetrators are the three Khan teenagers of Illinois, Anwar al-Awlaki of New Mexico and Omar Hammami of Alabama. While some terrorists have taken flight abroad, many others have acted on American soil, sparking new debate over U.S. agencies' anti-radicalization policies and controversial surveillance tactics meant to monitor potential terrorists. 

Drawing from an extensive network of intelligence sources, Peter Bergen, CNN's national security analyst and author of four other books on terrorism, has attempted to grasp not only the reasons some Americans turn to jihad, but also the ways in which the fear of terrorism has affected American society and forced government institutions to respond. United States of Jihad asks the following questions: what motivates homegrown American terrorists, how are they trained, and what do we sacrifice in our efforts to track them?

 

Watch full video of the discussion below:

Featuring:

Peter Bergen is a print, television, and web journalist, documentary producer, think tank director, and the author of four books, three of which were New York Times bestsellers. He is Vice President, Director of the Fellows Programs and the International Security Program at New America in Washington D.C., Professor of Practice at the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University where he is the co-director of the Center on the Future of War. Bergen is also CNN's national security analyst and a fellow at Fordham University's Center on National Security. Find him at PeterBergen.com. 


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Guantanamo Bay: Is An End In Sight?

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Guantanamo Bay: Is An End In Sight?

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

GUANTANAMO BAY: IS AN END IN SIGHT?

 

As the Obama administration accelerates Guantanamo detainee transfers, the closing of Guantanamo Bay may be on the horizon. On January 21. 2016, Carol Rosenberg, Daniel Rosenthal, J. Wells Dixon, Thomas Wilner and Janet Reitman joined the Center on National Security for a discussion about the policy challenges, legal concerns, and security considerations relating to the future of Guantanamo Bay.

 

Watch the full video of the discussion below:

Featuring:

Carol Rosenberg is the military-affairs reporter at The Miami Herald.  In 2011, she received the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for her nearly decade of reporting on the Guantanamo Bay prison.

Daniel Rosenthal is the former Director for Counterterrorism for the National Security Council at the White House, where he advised the President, the National Security Advisor, and the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security on U.S. Government counterterrorism efforts in response to persistent and emergent national security threats.

J. Wells Dixon is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights, where he specializes in challenging unlawful detentions at the Guantanamo prison.

Janet Reitman is an author and contributing editor at Rolling Stone Magazine, specializing in national security, terrorism, and U.S. foreign and domestic policy.

Thomas Wilner is the managing partner of Shearman & Sterling's International Trade and Global Relations Practice. Wilner has also represented the high-profile human rights cases of a dozen Kuwaiti citizens detained at Guantanamo Bay. 

Karen Greenberg, moderator, a noted expert on national security, terrorism, and civil liberties, is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law. She is the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days. 


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The The End of Pax Americana: Why Washington's Middle East Pullback Makes Sense

On November 18, 2015, the Center on National Security hosted Steven Simon and Jonathan Stevenson to discuss the future of U.S. involvement in the Middle East. 

Steve Simon a Visting Lecturer at Dartmouth College. He previously served as senior director for Middle Eastern and North African Affairs at the White House from 2011 through 2012.

Jonathan Stevenson is a professor of strategic studies at the U.S. Naval War College. From 2011 to 2013, he served as Director for Political Military Affairs, Middle East and North Africe on the Nation Security Staff at the White House.

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Iraq and Syria: Current Conflicts and Future Policy Implications

A Conversation With Brian Jenkens

Brian Jenkins is a senior adviser to the president of the RAND Corporation and author of numerous books, reports, and articles on terrorism-related topics, including Will Terrorists Go Nuclear? (2008, Prometheus Books). He formerly served as chair of the Political Science Department at RAND. On the occasion of the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, Jenkins initiated a RAND effort to take stock of America's policy reactions and give thoughtful consideration to future strategy. That effort is presented in The Long Shadow of 9/11: America's Response to Terrorism (Brian Michael Jenkins and John Paul Godges, eds., 2011).

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Turkey's Role in the World: Refugees, ISIS, and the Upcoming Elections

A Conversation with David Phillips, author of The Kurdish Spring (2015)

David L. Phillips is currently Director of the Program on Peace-building and Rights at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights. Mr. Phillips has worked as a senior adviser to the United Nations Secretariat and as a foreign affairs expert and senior adviser to the U.S. Department of State. Mr. Phillips is author of From Bullets to Ballots: Violent Muslim Movements in Transition (2008), Losing Iraq: Inside the Postwar Reconstruction Fiasco (2005), Unsilencing the Past: Track Two Diplomacy and Turkish-Armenian Reconciliation (2005). He has also authored many policy reports, as well as more than 100 articles in leading publications such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, International Herald Tribune, and Foreign Affairs.

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Objective Troy

A Conversation with author, Scott Shane

OBJECTIVE TROY tells the story of Anwar al-Awlaki, an American citizen and radical imam who has had enormous influence on terrorism suspects in the U.S.. He has, perhaps, been more influential than bin Laden himself.

Shane traces the evolution of the Obama administration’s counter-terrorism policy,  from campaigning against the excesses of President Bush's post-9/11 policies to embracing targeted killing, which culminated in the long pursuit and eventual killing of Awlaki.

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The Challenges of National Security Reporting

Panelists address the challenges of dealing with government secrecy and classification, the uptick in leak prosecutions under the Obama Administration and how that can affect reporting, how to balance the journalists' need for access to the intelligence and national security establishment with the demands for objectivity, among other topics.

Spencer Ackerman is the U.S. national security editor of The Guardian. He was part of the Guardian's team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service Journalism for reporting on the National Security Agency revelations from whistleblower Edward Snowden. Before joining The Guardian in 2013, Ackerman was senior editor at Wired.

Cora Currier is a journalist with The Intercept who focuses on national security, foreign affairs, and human rights. Previously, she covered national security and finance for ProPublica and was on the editorial staff of The New Yorker.

Adam Goldman covers terrorism and national security for The Washington Post. He was on the Associated Press Investigative Team in Washington, D.C., that the 2012 Pulitzer Prize of Investigative Reporting. He is co-author of "Enemies Within: Inside the NYPD's Secret Spying Unit and bin Laden's Final Plot Against America" (2013).

Janet Reitman is an author and contributing editor of Rollin Stone magazine, specializing  in national security, terrorism, and U.S. foreign and domestic policy. She was twice nominated for the National Magazine Award, including for her 2013 Rolling Stone cover story, "Jahar's World," a portrait of Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. She is the author if "Inside Scientology" (2011).

Grace Wyler is a journalist based in New York. She is an associate editor and political editor at VICE. She was previously the politics editor at Business Insider and has written for Time, New York Magazine,  and The New Republic.

Karen Greenberg (moderator) is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School

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Scott Horton and Lords of Secrecy: The National Security Elite and America's Stealth Warfare

Scott Horton is a contributing editor at Harper's magazine and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for his work on law and national security issues. Horton lectures at Columbia Law School and continues to practice law in the emerging markets area. A lifelong human rights advocate, Horton served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union. Horton's book, Lords of Secrecy: The National Security Elite and America's Stealth Warfare, was published by Nation Books in January 2015.

Lords of Secrecy explores the most important national security debates of our time, including the legal and moral issues surrounding the turn to private security contractors, the sweeping surveillance methods of intelligence agencies, and the use of robotic weapons such as drones. Horton looks at the legal edifice upon which these decisions are based and discusses approaches to rolling back the flood of secrets that is engulfing America today.Whistleblowers, but also Congress, the public, and the media, play a vital role in this process.

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A Conversation with Lawrence Wright about Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin and Sadat at Camp David

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A Conversation with Lawrence Wright about Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin and Sadat at Camp David

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

A CONVERSATION WITH LAWRENCE WRIGHT ABOUT THIRTEEN DAYS IN SEPTEMBER: CARTER, BEGIN, AND SADAT AT CAMP DAVID

Featuring Lawrence Wright and Adam Shatz

 

Wright combines politics, scripture, and the personal histories of the participants into a compelling narrative of a fragile peace process. Begin was an Orthodox Jew whose parents had perished in the Holocaust; Sadat was a pious Muslim inspired since boyhood by stories of martyrdom; Carter, who knew the Bible by heart, was driven by his faith to pursue the treaty, even as his advisers warned him of the political cost. Wright reveals an extraordinary moment of lifelong enemies working together, as well as the profound difficulties inherent in the process. Thirteen Days in September is a timely revisit of this diplomatic triumph and an inside look at how peace is formed.

 

Watch the full video of the discussion below:

Featuring:

Lawrence Wright is an author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker. He is the author of nine books including The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9-11 (2006), winner of the Pulitzer Prize and Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief (2013), a National Book Award Finalist.

Adam Shatz is a contributing editor at the London Review, and a contributor to the New York Review of Books and The Nation. He has reported from Palestine, Lebanon, Egypt and Algeria. He is also editor of the anthology, Prophets Outcast: A Century of Dissident Jewish Writing about Zionism and Israel. 

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Today's Terrorism: Today's Counter-terrorism

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Today's Terrorism: Today's Counter-terrorism

 

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW AND THE ARI HALBERSTAM MEMORIAL FUND PRESENT:

 

TODAY'S TERRORISM: TODAY'S COUNTER-TERRORISM

 

On November 3, 2014, the Center hosted Today's Terrorism: Today's Counter-terrorism, a day-long conference that gathered some of the country's leading experts in counter-terrorism strategy, counter-radicalization efforts, and national security practice to promote critical thinking about the pressing questions surrounding the threat of international terrorism today. The conference drew over 500 participants from law enforcement, public policy, and major media outlets. In his much-publicized keynote address, FBI Director James Comey discussed several national security issues, including the recruitment policies of ISIS and other extremist groups, as well as the implications of the encryption of data by companies like Google and Apple. 

 

Watch videos of the entire conference here:

Featuring:

James Comey was appointed FBI Director in September 2013. A New York Native, Comey graduated from the College of William & Mary and the University of Chicago Law School. Following law school, Comey served as assistant United States attorney for both the Southern District of New York and the Eastern District of Virginia. In 2003, he became the deputy attorney general at the Department of Justice. Comey left the DOJ in 2005 to serve as general counsel and senior VP at Lockheed Martin. Five years later, he joined Bridgewater Associates, a Connecticut-based investment fund, as its general counsel.

David Raskin is a partner in the international law firm Clifford Chance. He was, for many years, an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Southern District of New York, where he worked on complicated terrorism cases. Raskin was lead prosecutor in the 9/11 terrorism cases. 

Dr. Nelly Lahoud is a Senior Fellow for Political Islamism at the International Institute for Strategic Studies-Middle East. Her recent research has focused on the ideology and evolution of al Qaeda and ISIS. She was lead author in Letters from Abbottabad, the report that analyzed declassified documents captured in Osama bin Laden's compound. Dr. Lahoud's other publications also include: The Group That Calls Itself a State: Understanding the Evolution and Challenges of the Islamic State, "The Neglected Sex: The Jihadis' Exclusion of Women from Jihad," Terrorism and Political ViolenceJihadi Discourse in the Wake of the Arab Spring, and The Jihadis' Path to Self-Destruction, among others. 

Matthew Glen Olsen is Prosecutor and former Director of the National Counter-terrorism Center. He has worked for over two decades as a top government official on national secutiy, intelligence and law enforcement issues. Mr. Olsen  is responsible for leading IronNet's consulting services, providing strategic and operational guidance to companies on cybersecurity and cyber threats. He also served at the Department of Justice in a number of leadership positions, and has also served as Special Counsel to the Director of the Federal Bureau in Washington. Mr. Olsen is a lecturer at Harvard Law School and a national security analyst for ABC News. 

Rebecca Weiner is the director of intelligence for the NYPD. Prior to joining the NYPD, she was the International Security Program research fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. 

Peter Bergen is a print, television and web journalist, documentary producer, think tank director and the author of four books, three of which were New York Times bestsellers. He is Vice President and Director of the Fellows Programs and the International Security Program at New America in Washington D.C., Professor of Practice at the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University where he is the co-director of the Center on the Future of War. Bergen is also CNN's national security analyst and a fellow at Fordham University's Center on National Security.

Deborah Feyerick is an award-winning National Correspondent at CNN specializing in crime and terrorism. Feyerick's in-depth investigative reports focus on cyber-security threats and the vulnerability of U.S. infrastructur and  jihadi recruitment. She has developed an extensive knowledge of terror groups, witnessing in-person multiple al Qaeda linked operatives and lone wolf terrorists. She has covered the trials and hearings of the alleged Boston Bomber, the Underwear Bomber, 9/11's Zacarias Moussaoui, the U.S. Embassy bombers and the American Taliban John Walker Lindh, among others. 

 

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Gideon's Army at Guantanamo: The Challenges Facing Defense Teams in the Military Commissions System

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Gideon's Army at Guantanamo: The Challenges Facing Defense Teams in the Military Commissions System

 

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

GIDEON'S ARMY AT GUANTANAMO: THE CHALLENGES FACING DEFENSE TEAMS IN THE MILITARY COMMISSIONS SYSTEM

 

A panel of leading defense attorneys discuss the myriad obstacles to defense at Guantanamo, including: inadequate resources, detainee treatment in custody, difficulty with access to clients and witnesses, government interference with confidentiality, and excessive classification of material and testimony, among other issues.  

 

Watch full video of the discussion below: 

Featuring:

James Harrington is a prominent defense attorney and a partner at Harrington & Mahoney in Buffalo, NY.

Rick Kammen is a leading criminal defense lawyer with his office in Indianapolis, IN. He concentrates his practice in white-collar defense, complex crimes, heath care issues as well as death penalty defenses.

Michel Paradis currently serves as Defense Counsel for the Department of Defense, Office of the Chief Defense Counsel. He is also an adjunct professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center.

Martha Rayner is a clinical professor of law at Fordham Law School who founded the International Justice Clinic where students engage in litigation and advocacy on behalf of Guantanamo Bay prisoners.

Jason Wright is a former United States Army Major and Judge Advocate. In May 2011, Mr, Wright was one of two lawyers assigned to defend Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, and in August 2014, he resigned from the Army after receiving orders that made it impossible for him to remain on Mr. Mohammed's defense team.

Karen Greenberg (moderator) is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School

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Back to the Future of U.S.-Russia Relations

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Back to the Future of U.S.-Russia Relations

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW AND THE PEN AMERICAN CENTER PRESENT:

 

BACK TO THE FUTURE OF U.S.-RUSSIA RELATIONS

 

A conversation with leading foreign policy experts discussing how to best understand Putin's recent aggression and how to delineate U.S. foreign policy challenges in the wake of the conflict with Ukraine. Discussion heavily revolves around the future of U.S.-Russian relations.

 

Watch full video of the discussion below:

Featuring:

Stephen Sestanovich is a professor international diplomacy at Columbia University as well as the George F. Kennan Senior Fellow for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Kimberly Marten is a professor of political science at Barnard College, a faculty member at the School of International Public Affairs at Columbia University, and the Deputy Director for Development at Columbia's Harriman Institute for Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies.

Mark Galeotti is a Clinical Full Professor of Global Affairs at the Center for Global Affairs at New York University. He is an expert and prolific author on transnational crime and Russian security affairs.

Julia Ioffe is a senior editor of The New Republic and specializes in Russian affairs.

Stephen Holmes (moderator) is the Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law at New York University.

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Terrorism Prosecutions: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

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Terrorism Prosecutions: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

 

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

TERRORISM PROSECUTION: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE CHALLENGES

 

What are the major challenges today facing terrorism investigations and prosecutions? Have the criticisms of civil libertarians about the way these cases are handled made an impact on the strategies of law enforcement? 

 

Watch full video of the discussion below:

Featuring:

Seth Ducharme: A Deputy Chief of the National Security and Cybercrime Section of the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Linda Moreno: A leading defense attorney specializing in terrorism and national security cases.

John Dolan: Acting Assistant Special Agent in Charge, FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force

Andrea Prasow: Deputy Washing Director at Human Rights Watch who has recently authored a study on terrorism investigations and prosecutions.

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