The Soufan Group Morning Brief


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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2016
GUANTANAMO REVIEW BOARD FINDS 24TH DETAINEE TOO DANGEROUS TO RELEASE

The Periodic Review Board at Guantanamo Bay has found another detainee, Saudi-born Hassan Bin Attash, too dangerous to release, making him the 24th “forever prisoner” held at the U.S. military prison. Hassan Bin Attash is the younger brother of Walid Bin Attash, who is awaiting a war court trial as an alleged deputy in the 9/11 attacks. Hassan Bin Attash is suspected of serving as an explosives specialist and aide to several senior Al Qaeda members. He was captured in Pakistan in 2002 and held for at least 120 days by the CIA. He arrived at Guantanamo in 2004 and has never been charged with a crime. Miami Herald

NEW YORK BOMBING SUSPECT PLEADS NOT GUILTY IN FIRST COURT APPEARANCE
The suspect in last month’s New York and New Jersey bombings pleaded not guilty on Thursday to charges related to his attempted murder of police officers during the shootout prior to his arrest. Ahmad Khan Rahimi appeared before a New Jersey court via video conference from a hospital, where he continues to recover from wounds he sustained during the shootout. New York Times, Washington Post, NBC

Use-of-Force Database: The FBI announced it will launch a pilot program next year to collect use-of-force statistics from around the country to create a national database of police interactions with the public. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said on Thursday that the program aims “toward increasing transparency and building trust between law enforcement and the communities we serve,” and that “accurate and comprehensive data on the use of force by law enforcement is essential to an informed and productive discussion about community-police relations.” Washington Post


FORMER NUCLEAR LAUNCH OPERATORS WARN AGAINST TRUMP
Ten former nuclear launch operators have signed an open letter declaring that they think Donald Trump cannot be trusted with the country’s nuclear codes. The former operators said the command of nuclear weapons requires “composure, judgment, restraint and diplomatic skill” and said that Trump “has shown himself time and again to be easily baited and quick to lash out, dismissive of expert consultation and ill-informed of even basic military and international affairs—including, most especially, nuclear weapons.” Washington Post


U.S. SUPPORT TO SAUDI ARABIA DEPENDS ON COMPLIANCE WITH YEMEN CEASEFIRE
Future U.S. military assistance to Saudi Arabia will depend partly on whether the kingdom complies with a UN and U.S.-backed ceasefire with Houthi rebels, according to a senior government official. The Obama administration is reportedly attempting to distance itself from the Saudi-led military coalition that has repeatedly killed civilians in Yemen. Washington Post

Related:
New York Times: Yemen Sees U.S. Strikes as Evidence of Hidden Hand Behind Saudi Air War
The Hill: Report: US-made bomb used in 'apparent war crime' in Yemen

Syria: A car bomb killed at least 20 people, mostly Syrian fighters, near a checkpoint close to the Bab al Salama crossing along the Turkey-Syria border. The explosion occurred near a checkpoint manned by a group of fighters from the Free Syrian Army’s Jabhat al Shamiya. Reuters


United Nations: On Thursday, the United Nations formally appointed former Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Guterres as its next secretary-general. Guterres will take over for Ban Ki-moon on January 1, 2017 for a term lasting through 2022. The Hill
TOP OP-EDS
The Russian Hacking Whodunnit: “If U.S. intelligence officials are to be believed, Putin has escalated the battle by feeding Wikileaks purloined Clinton campaign emails. But they’ve offered no definitive proof of a link between the two,” writes Jeff Stein on Newsweek. “Should the Obama administration up the ante on Putin, meanwhile, the Russians have plenty of chips to play with.”

The Spy We Forgot: Intelligence officials “were forewarned about the vulnerability of digital secrets a full 16 years ago by the actions of a little-known traitor named Brian Regan. A signals analyst at the National Reconnaissance Office—an agency responsible for managing the country’s spy satellites—Mr. Regan pulled off a heist of more than 20,000 documents containing top-secret satellite images and reports, which he tried to sell to Iraq and Libya,” writes Yudhijit Bhattacharjee in The New York Times.

How to Win the Cyberwar Against Russia: “What’s much less clear is what a ‘proportional’ response [against Russia] could mean. This is an unprecedented situation for the American national security establishment—which means the Obama administration’s response will set a precedent for future foreign-directed cyber-plots,” writes James Stavridis on Foreign Policy. “All of this should be done in a very careful, measured fashion. The potential for miscalculation and escalation is high. But that potential pertains both to a possible overreaction as well as an under-reaction by the U.S. government.”
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For cutting-edge analysis of the geopolitical events shaping global affairs, read today’s TSG IntelBrief: Confronting Ambush Attacks Against Police




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