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"Appeals court upholds conspiracy conviction of Guantanamo Bay detainee" The Washington Post

The nation’s second-highest court on Thursday upheld the conviction of a Guantanamo Bay detainee, siding with the government in a case that tested the power of the military tribunal system. At oral arguments before the full court, Justice Department lawyers urged the judges to “be wary of setting outer bounds” that curtail military tribunals at Cuba’s Guantanamo Bay. Bahlul’s lawyer said that the government’s position would allow military tribunals to usurp the traditional role of civilian courts in handling domestic crimes. “The political branches have replaced judicial power with a military trial chamber,” Bahlul’s attorney, Michel Paradis, told the court late last year.

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What’s Driving the Passion Behind JASTA? LawFare Blog

Michel Paradis writes that the hardest argument to ignore when it comes to the Justice Against Sponsored Terrorism Act (JASTA) has been from the victims of the September 11th attack. The moral and political clout of this group is unquestionably why a Congress that cannot pass a routine budget was able to overwhelmingly override a presidential veto to ensure that JASTA became law. Paradis argues that the failure to bring the perpetrators of September 11th into a real courtroom for the past fifteen years has meant that the victims’ families and the country as a whole have been denied this opportunity for a battle-tested truth, and as a result, denied the opportunity for closure.

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"Geeking Out on Al-Nashiri with Michel Paradis and Bob Loeb" Lawfare Podcast

Michel Paradis joined Bob Loeb and Benjamin Wittes on the Lawfare Podcast to discuss the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeal's recent ruling in the Al-Nashiri case. This discussion follows the ins and outs of the court's ruling from both a legal and a policy perspective.

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"Sailor Accused of Spying for China Could Dodge Trial," The Daily Beast, April 28, 2016.

A Navy sailor charged with sharing classified information to Taiwan and China—allegations that carry a potential life sentence in prison—could still avoid a full military trial. The situation is complicated, says Paradis, by "a number of other people in the decision-making process whose priorities are not aligned with criminal prosecution.”

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"UNDER THE RADAR" POLITICO

“Judges on a federal appeals court sounded open Wednesday to halting military commission proceedings against a Saudi man alleged to have planned the attack on the USS Cole, which killed 17 American sailors.” Mr. Paradis was the attorney defending the accused individual. He noted that there is good reason not to define all kinds of violence as hostilities. "The law of war swings both ways," he said. If it's a war, "it's perfectly legal for them to shoot back."

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"Lawyer for suspect in USS Cole bombing foresees appeal in 2024" The Virginian Pilot

Attorney Michel Paradis, counsel to the foreign terrorist seized in 2002 who’s now awaiting trial before a U.S. military commission at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is optimistic about his client's chances for a civilian appeal in the distant future.

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"The National Security Dimension of Birthright Citizenship" Lawfare

Michel Paradis explains the legal-historical context for the ongoing debate on birthright citizenship and details its relationship to U.S. national security.

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"Gideon's Army at Guantanamo" Just Security

Michel Paradis, taking part in a panel at the Center on National Security, describes the difficulties of gaining access to clients at Guantanamo Bay.

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