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"Middle East In Focus" KPFK Public Radio

Karen Greenberg discusses the present and future of Guantánamo on the Middle East In Focus podcast.  Referencing the recent resignation of lawyers working on the USS Cole case, she said, "this is a system that starts to eat its own." She also brings up concerns about the unnamed American that is currently in U.S. custody in an unknown location and being labeled an enemy combatant.

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“Suspect in New York truck attack pleads not guilty to murder and terrorism charges” PBS NewsHour

Phil Hirschkorn writes that Sayfullo Saipov pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and terrorism in Manhattan. He states that as charges were given to Siapov, a jury convicted Ahmed Abu Khattala of charges related to terrorism in Washington D.C.. Karen Greenberg said these cases are “examples of how prosecuting terrorists in civilian courts still works, and using military commissions instead is a deluded idea.”

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"Prosecuting Terrorists in Civilian Courts Still Works" The Atlantic

"On November 15, the defense rested in the trial of terrorism suspect, Abu Khattala, the alleged conspirator behind the 2014 attack in Benghazi, Libya, which resulted in the deaths of U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans. Given the notoriety of Khattala’s case, one might think it would garner greater notice. Yet his trial lasted seven largely uneventful weeks,” writes Karen J. Greenberg in The Atlantic. “For years, the Justice Department has worked to ensure that terrorism suspects wind up in federal court and not in military commissions. Now, under Trump and Sessions, things may be shifting.”

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"Karen Greenberg speaks with Al Jazeera" Al Jazeera

Karen Greenberg is interviewed on Al Jazeera about the recent terrorist attack in New York City and upcoming security measures the New York Police Department will take. 

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“Fear and Tragedy in New York City” WNYC

Karen Greenberg appears on WNYC’s The Takeaway to discuss the terrorist attack in lower Manhattan. She explains that classifying this as a terrorist attack can give investigators and intelligence officers time to speak with the suspect prior to him being given his Miranda rights and then, after being read his Miranda rights, the suspect is turned over to law enforcement. Karen Greenberg also discusses the rarity of the circumstances in the U.S. in which the suspect has survived the attack and possible ways in which the case will proceed.

 

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“Inspired or recruited? A question for investigators in the N.Y. terror attack” NJ

A recent study by the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law found more than 100 ISIS prosecution cases filed in this country between March 2014 and June 30, 2016, nearly eight in 10 individuals charged were U.S. citizens. A third were converts to Islam. Karen Greenberg said  saying that the new propaganda from ISIS is to “do something where you are.”  

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“A Domestic Terrorism Statute is Overreach, Not Justice” NBC News

Karen Greenberg discusses a potential domestic terrorism statute, bringing up concerns about abuses. She writes, “since its inception, the United States has periodically descended into untoward moments in which the law has become a cudgel for political agendas.” Greenberg states that a domestic terrorism statute would be an extension of an unfair process to an undefined and unlimited amount of people in the United States and would undermine laws that protect Americans from government abuses.

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""Enemy Combatants" Again? Will Washington Never Learn?" TOMDISPATCH

Karen Greenberg discusses the use of the term “enemy combatant” by the current Trump administration, and how the use of the term signals the direction the administration is will take when dealing with detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Greenberg states that “enemy combatant” was used by the Bush administration to categorize detainees in order to exempt them from normal protections afforded to prisoners of war

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"Benghazi suspect’s criminal trial to test speed of U.S. courts vs. military tribunals" The Washington Times

The Washington Times discusses how Ahmed Abu Khattala being tried in a Federal Court may highlight the advantages of prosecuting terrorism cases in American courts rather than military tribunals. Karen Greenberg discusses these advantages specific to this case saying in a public trial, “you learn a tremendous amount about the people involved, the sequence of events. It really will be settling to the American people to have a narrative presented by the evidence admitted in court.”

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"A Captured American ISIS Fighter Could Undermine the Whole War" The Daily Beast

This article discusses the legal issues presented by the Trump administration’s detainment in military custody of a US citizen who was fighting for ISIS. One such legal problem is presented by Karen Greenberg who points out that under Bush’s 2001 executive order on detainment only someone “who is not a United States citizen” was eligible for military captivity.

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“On UN’s World Stage, Leaders Brace for Trump” Courthouse News

This article discusses some of the uncertainties surrounding Trump’s upcoming UN speech and the geopolitical issues it might affect. Karen Greenberg, predicts minimal shakeup.

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      "What we know about ISIS-related crimes in the U.S."  PBS NewsHour   Over the past few years, Islamic State operatives or sympathizers have carried out attacks on civilians around the world, and U.S. federal prosecutors have brought ISIS-related terrorism charges in 135 cases. This week, the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School released a report on those cases. Karen Greenberg, the center's director, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on their findings.      </iframe>" data-provider-name=""

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"What we know about ISIS-related crimes in the U.S." PBS NewsHour

Over the past few years, Islamic State operatives or sympathizers have carried out attacks on civilians around the world, and U.S. federal prosecutors have brought ISIS-related terrorism charges in 135 cases. This week, the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School released a report on those cases. Karen Greenberg, the center's director, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on their findings.

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"International, domestic terrorism convicts set to be released in US” Los Angeles Daily News

This article discusses how many of those convicted of terrorism sentences since 9/11 are being released from prison as their sentences begin to expire. Karen Greenberg offers some reasons why this will not create a great a problem as the public might believe.

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"Homegrown US Terrorists Have Received Lighter Sentences in Recent Years" VOA News

In this article Masood Farivar looks at the sentencing trends in recent terrorism trials. Karen Greenberg explains how the perceived risks associated with different classes of those convicted of terrorism offences drives sentencing decisions.

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"A Planet’s Future Threatened by the Fate of Its Children” TOMDISPATCH

In this article Karen Greenberg explores some of the consequences that growing up in conflict zones can have on the long term psychological development in children. She discusses the implications of US policy in relation to children and the long term stability of the Middle East.

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“Historians hear echoes of Watergate’s 1973 Saturday Night Massacre in Comey’s firing” ABC News

ABC News reports on the firing of FBI Director James Comey with historians examining the similarities and differences with the Watergate scandal. Karen Greenberg says, "at this point, abuse of power and obstruction of justice are the main issues, and it's important to point out that each one raises many other subsidiary issues. One in particular is how Sessions could be a part of this firing when supposedly he recused himself from any participation in the investigation into the election." She continued saying, "the optics are hard to overcome, especially given Trump's Twitter feed, the attacks on accusers and his meeting with Russian officials that excluded the U.S. press."

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“How Two Mississippi College Students Fell In Love and Decided to Join A Terrorist Organization” The Atlantic

The Atlantic reports on two college students who attempted to join ISIS together but were arrested by the FBI before they could leave the country. Karen Greenberg commented on the subsequent legal cases saying, “if you do go to trial, the penalty is immense.” She says that for the public, “there’s still a lot you won’t find out because the government will say it’s classified.  But there’s an awful lot that does come out. And one of the things that can get litigated in open court is the role of the FBI.”

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“The Lioness in Winter” Mother Jones

Mother Jones profiles Senator Dianne Feinstein and her navigation of U.S. politics, most recently, the Trump administration. Feinstein has a complicated relationship with U.S. intelligence agencies. Karen Greenberg commented on Feinstein’s work on torture and ISIS saying. "if you're in her position and you don't trust the CIA it's destructive on a level that is hard to imagine."

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