Zero Dark Thirty: Torture, Art, and Politics



THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

ZERO DARK THIRTY: TORTURE, ART, AND POLITICS

Panelists included New Yorker staff writer Jane Mayer, former FBI agent and author Ali Soufan, and documentary filmmaker Alex Gibney. Moderated by CNS Director Karen J. Greenberg.

 

Since the release of Zero Dark Thirty, many critics, including several U.S. Senators, have condemned the film, claiming it contains serious historical inaccuracies and glorifies some of the country's worst post 9-11 abuses. In response, Fordham University Law School and Georgetown University Law School have both decided to host events focused on the relationship and responsibility that prominent works of culture have to the historical record and the American public.

Panelists:

Jane Mayer is an investigative journalist who is a staff writer for The New Yorker. Mayer's third nonfiction book, The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals (2008), addresses the origins, legal justifications, and possible war crimes liability of the use of enhanced interrogation techniques on detainees and the subsequent deaths of detainees under such interrogation by the CIA and DOD. The book was a finalist for the National Book Awards.

Ali Soufan is the CEO and Chairman of the Soufan Group and a former Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Supervisory Special Agent who investigated and supervised highly sensitive and complex international terrorism cases, including the East Africa Embassy Bombings, the attack on the USS Cole, and the events surrounding 9/11.

Alex Gibney is an American documentary film director and producer. His film, Taxi to the Dark Side, focuses on an innocent taxi driver in Afghanistan who was tortured and killed at Bagram Air Force in 2002. The film won the 2007 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Karen Greenberg is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School and author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days, which was selected as one of the best books of 2009.