Guantanamo Bay: Is an End In Sight?



  • Center on National Security at Fordham Law (map)
  • 150 West 62nd Street, 2nd Floor
  • New York, NY, 10023
  • United States

THE CENTER ON NATIONAL SECURITY AT FORDHAM LAW PRESENTS:

 

GUANTANAMO BAY: IS AN END IN SIGHT?

 

As the Obama administration accelerates Guantanamo detainee transfers, the closing of Guantanamo Bay may be on the horizon.  Carol Rosenberg, Daniel Rosenthal, J. Wells Dixon, Thomas Wilner and Janet Reitman joined the Center on National Security for a discussion about the policy challenges, legal concerns, and security considerations relating to the future of Guantanamo Bay.

Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 7pm

Fordham Law School

Costantino, 2nd Floor

150 West 62nd Street

Carol Rosenberg is the military-affairs reporter at The Miami Herald.  In 2011, she received the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for her nearly decade of reporting on the Guantanamo Bay prison.

Daniel Rosenthal is the former Director for Counterterrorism for the National Security Council at the White House, where he advised the President, the National Security Advisor, and the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security on U.S. Government counterterrorism efforts in response to persistent and emergent national security threats.

J. Wells Dixon is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights, where he specializes in challenging unlawful detentions at the Guantanamo prison.

Janet Reitman is an author and contributing editor at Rolling Stone Magazine, specializing in national security, terrorism, and U.S. foreign and domestic policy.

Thomas Wilner is the managing partner of Shearman & Sterling's International Trade and Global Relations Practice. Wilner has also represented the high-profile human rights cases of a dozen Kuwaiti citizens detained at Guantanamo Bay. 

Karen Greenberg, moderator, a noted expert on national security, terrorism, and civil liberties, is the Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law. She is the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days.